Friday, July 3, 2015

Bakery Fun Soleil

Both mine and Ivy’s favorite summer pieces from her wardrobe last summer were her knit dresses. She’s outgrown all of them now, and they’ve been packed up and sent off to a friend. So I get to make her new ones for this year. First up, a Soleil Dress by Selvedge Designs in Bakery Fun by Lillestoff.

lillestoff bakery fun soleil dress sew a straight line-10

I love how little fabric the Soleil uses. I only had .5 meter of this knit, but was able to get all the main pieces out of it, with a tiny bit left over.  It helps that Euro knits like Lillestoff are extra wide, giving you just a little bit more fabric than most. I used some Riley Blake polka dots knit for the rest: the binding, and pocket bags and facings.

lillestoff bakery fun soleil dress sew a straight line-1

I bought the fabrics separately last year, and didn’t notice how well they went together until I was pulling down fabric for another project and these two ended up laying next to each other. It was meant to be. There is a unique sense of relief and satisfaction, finding two unrelated fabrics in your stash that coordinate so well!
  lillestoff bakery fun soleil dress sew a straight line-3

Ivy calls this her “Nummies Dress”, and has worn it three days straight now. She even slept cuddled up with it last night. The Bakery Fun print is so random and funny. She likes to go up and ask us, “What would you like, customer?” and then “pick” the treats off her dress for us to eat. When I told her I was going to buy her a pretzel, like those on the print, for the photoshoot, she couldn’t stop giggling, she was so excited.

lillestoff bakery fun soleil dress sew a straight line-2
The Soleil is one of my very favorite patterns for Ivy. It’s a simple, comfortable dress, and easy sew using not much fabric, and then there is that opening at the back that is unexpected and perfect.

lillestoff bakery fun soleil dress sew a straight line-4
I made the size 3 for her this year, but it’s still too big, especially around her tiny frame. It’s especially obvious at the back opening, which gaps quite a bit on her. The hem isn’t long enough that I think it will work for next year, and she would throw a fit if I tried to take it away, so I’m just going to let her wear it as is rather than storing it until summer ‘16. I’ve made her next dresses (soon to be blogged) with wider seam allowances through the bodice, and I like the fit much better. I’m going to try taking this one in a bit, if I can peel it off her little body without too much of a fight.

lillestoff bakery fun soleil dress sew a straight line-5

But it’s going to have to wait until later, because she’s wearing it again today and I don’t think it’s such a good idea to come between a three year old and her Nummies Dress. Or her pretzel.

lillestoff bakery fun soleil dress sew a straight line-11

Dress: Soleil Dress by Selvedge Designs, size 3. Main print is Bakery Fun knit by Lillestoff, contrasting is Riley Blake Polka Dots
knit
Sandals:
Salt Water Sandals by Hoy Shoe The Original Sandal (affiliate link)

lillestoff bakery fun soleil dress sew a straight line-8

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Willow & Co Tour: Valencia Tunic and Limon Dress

I had the opportunity to sew up some of one of my favorite collective’s newest patterns for myself and Ivy. Willow & Co just released their newest collection last month, and it is all about looks for women and girls. I thought it would be fun to do some mom-and-me pieces with the Valencia Tunic and the Limon Dress.

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-1-4

I used white cotton gauze and some really pretty white-on-white embroidered cotton for both, and then used the same techniques for the sleeve finishes on each.

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-4

 

First, the Valencia Tunic. This is a women’s pattern by Mouse House Creations. The actual pattern is for a sleeveless top, but I drafted some simple sleeves to go on mine.

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-27
There is a really pretty, shaped yoke at the front, with looped button holes, and gathering below. I used the embroidered fabric for the yokes and some clear shank buttons at the closure. Here is where I draw attention to the thing I’m going to ask you not to pay attention to. I really should have pressed this. But my iron has something on it, and when I pressed Ivy’s dress, it left horrible markings on it. Thankfully, the markings washed out. I didn’t think to use a pressing cloth until we were on our way out the door for the photoshoot. So yeah. Don’t pay attention to that bit of neckline curling out there. Thanks.

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-1-2

I did a scalloped, satin stitch finish at the sleeves. It’s super easy and I thought it would look nice with the embroidery and the floweyness of the gauzy top.

There is another yoke at the back, with gathering below. Just pretty stuff.

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-1-3

Overall, the pattern is nicely put together and the instructions very easy to follow. The sizing is generous, so if you were to sew this in a heavier fabric, I’d probably err on the small size. In the gauze, though, I like the roomy, flowy look.  It’s perfect for summer and I’m excited to get some good wear out of it in the next few months.

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-30
And now for Ivy’s dress. 

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-2
Tangent:: in looking through pictures, I have this weird habit of having my mouth wide open when playing with my children. Like I’m about to eat them. I do it all.the.time. Why do I do this? It’s a wonder they don’t have nightmares of being swallowed whole by me.

So, the Limon Dress.

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-6 

The pattern is by Charming Doodle.  A pretty dress or top with pintucks and ruffles and just really cute.

       Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-19
I found the pattern markings for the front pintucks really confusing. There are just so many lines, with the wide range of sizes (12m-12y), and I felt like I was going cross eyed trying to figure out which was which. So, I just winged the placement of the tucks. They aren’t super evenly spaced, but I still like them a lot.

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-17

The tucks at the back were much easier for me to get off the pattern markings. And I threw in some of the embroidered cotton at the yoke. I really, really love the back. Really. Even though I accidently pressed and then sewed down one tuck the wrong direction. Can you find which one? Now stop looking at it, please.

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-20
I finished both the hem and the sleeves with the same satin scallop stitch as on my Valencia Tunic. It looks kind of like a rolled hem. It’s such an easy way to hem things.

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-23

My favorite part of the pattern, I don’t have pictures of. It’s the lined inside. The body of the dress is fully lined and uses The Coolest technique to completely enclose the seams at the armscyth. Very professional finish. The fit is a bit baggier than I would like, but Ivy is tiny and this seems to be a theme with her clothing. I sewed her a size two (lengthened to a 3), but should have gone with the 18months. It’s a bit gapey at the neckline on her, but still really sweet.

And that’s our look!

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-15Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-14
You can check out the entire collection, along with the previous pattern releases at Willow & Co. It’s all beautiful and so perfect for spring and summer. If you sew for yourself or little girls at all, you need to check it out! And check out the Willow & Co blog for more looks from the summer tour!

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-11   

On Ivy: Limon Dress by Charming Doodle for Willow & Co. Fabric is cotton gauze and embroidered cotton from Jo-Ann Stores
Sandals: Salt Water Sandals by Hoy Shoe The Original Sandal (affiliate link)
On Me: Valencia Tunic by Mouse House Creations for Willow & Co. Fabric is cotton gauze and embroidered cotton from
Jo-Ann Stores
Jeans are unblogged, altered
Jalie 2908 
Sandals: Swedish Hasbeens
(affiliate)

Willow and Co Valencia Top Limon Dress sew a straight line-18

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Red Desert Jeans

Jonas got some new jeans a few weeks ago. New red jeans. New red Desert Jeans.

Ottobre 12014 30 desert jeans sew a straight line-3

They’re pretty rad.
Ottobre 12014 30 desert jeans sew a straight line-6

The pattern is the Desert Jeans from Ottobre 1/2014 (#30). I made the same pattern for Seth a couple of years ago, seen HERE. Seth has since outgrown that pair in the length, and they’ve been passed onto the Third Boy. Jonas needed some red clothing for a family picture with his cousins, and he also needed new pants. So the boy got red Desert Jeans.

Ottobre 12014 30 desert jeans sew a straight line-9
It’s hard to get the details in these photos, especially since I went with tonal topstitching. But they have awesome tucks and bar tacks on the pockets and all the regular jeans finishes. I used the exact same fabric as last time, a stretch poplin from Jo-Ann Stores, just in red instead of khaki.  Unlike last time, I didn’t bother with the back tab. It just seemed superfluous since my kids need belts anyway. Plus, I was making these the night before the family pictures, so I had to budget my time a bit.

Ottobre 12014 30 desert jeans sew a straight line-4 
But they turned out awesome, and he looked great.

2015-51333-17photo by FotoFly
 
A little brag, since this is my blog and it’s pretty much what I do here:
I made all of my children’s clothing they wore in that picture (not the cousins, just my kids), with the exception of Kael’s pants and Jonas’ sweater.
Yep, feeling pretty good about that.

Ottobre 12014 30 desert jeans sew a straight line-2

Now, let’s discuss for a bit this boy and his modeling.

Ottobre 12014 30 desert jeans sew a straight line-1-2

I don’t know if I’ve mentioned it before, but I pay my kids a little bit for each photo shoot they do for my blog. I figure I make a little off my blog, they should, too, since they are the #1 reason people even read this thing. Plus, then I don’t feel quite so bad for exploiting them on the internet. So, Kael and Jonas have both decided that makes them professional models and they take these shoots pretty seriously. Seth gets annoyed, and usually insists on more money to comply, Ivy is three and spastic. But Kael and Jonas request photo shoots, and plan their poses and whatnot out ahead of time.

Ottobre 12014 30 desert jeans sew a straight line-5     
I’ve found that when I just go with their ideas, we get some pretty fun, artistic shots.

Ottobre 12014 30 desert jeans sew a straight line-7
Maybe a bit random at times, but good stuff.  Makes it even more fun to sew for them when I know they’re excited to show it all off !

Ottobre 12014 30 desert jeans sew a straight line-10
Tee: Recess Raglan by See Kate Sew, originally blogged HERE
Jeans: 
Ottobre Designs Dessert Jeans from 1/2014 (#30), 134 cm.  Fabric is stretch brushed poplin from Jo-Ann Stores
Shoes:
Sanuk Kids Boy's Vagabond Chill (Toddler/Little Kid/Big Kid) (affiliate)
Watch: Chic SHHORS LED Watch (affiliate)

 
Ottobre 12014 30 desert jeans sew a straight line-1

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Vintage May: McCall’s Sunsuit

VM Large
I am so very excited to be joining in with Jess from Craftiness is Not Optional and Kristin from Skirt as Top for their annual Vintage May! So excited! I have actually been planning on making this little McCall’s sunsuit for Ivy anyway, so the timing was perfect.



  A vintage pattern, some charcoal linen, and red embroidery.  Throw in some chickens and a darling little girl I happen to know. Vintage May!


The pattern is McCall’s1330 Toddlers’ Sunsuit, c. 1947. This pattern came to me  from my grandmother, via my mom, who would have been the toddler my grandmother sewed this for. It’s pretty special to me. I love thinking of my grandmother sewing this, and then my mom as a little toddler wearing her little sunsuit.

 


I’ve sewn this pattern before, two years ago. But the last time I sewed it, I had the sizing all wrong and had to make quite a few changes. (see the 2013 sunsuit HERE) Still adorable, but this go ‘round is much more true to the actual pattern and design. I sewed View B, and even did the embroidery included in the pattern.



The only change I made was to the leg openings. I did a scalloped satin-stitch edging to them, instead of the hand-stitched facing the pattern uses. I wanted to bring more of the red stitching into play, and it was so, so SO much faster to do than blind stitching facing around the legs.

View B has a clean front, with the straps fastening in the back at two hidden buttons on the inside of the waistband.


I could not get my camera to focus on the button here. For some reason, it just wanted to highlight that spot just to the right. Weird. But anyway, see the blurry button on the inside of the waistband? There are two of them, for each strap. And they’re also vintage, from a jar of buttons my mom gave me. 


  I love this pattern.


It’s pretty and delicate and innocent and delightfully ‘40s.




Some off-the-model shots so you can better see the pleats and the overall look of the sunsuit.





The bum is really baggy. I guess to accommodate large cloth nappies. But even then. Huge. I think I’ll probably try to bring the center crotch seam up just a bit in the back, to keep the bum flap to a minimum. But the front. Oh! How I adore the front! I love the crispness of the pleats, and then that embroidery is just my very favorite. Modern patterns really should come with embroidery transfers more often, don’t you think?


 

Because I treasure this pattern as I do, I want to preserve it as much as I can. I didn’t want to use the transfer paper by ironing it onto my fabric, even though I know you can usually get a few uses out of it. I also didn’t want to iron onto my fabric because I was using dark fabric and I was afraid the transfer markings wouldn’t show. So what can you do instead of ironing the transfer paper? Trace!

 

I have a light box, but you can also tape your transfer paper to a sunny window. Then tape some tear-away embroidery stabilizer (affiliate link) on top of the transfer paper. Then just trace out the design onto the matte side of the paper.



You can also just make your own designs to embroider this way.
From there, follow the instructions to adhere the stabilizer where you want the embroidery on your fabric.
 
And stitch away! I don’t have an embroidery machine, and I didn’t want to take the time to do all that design by hand. So I did it on my regular sewing machine. I used a thick stitch, on my machine it’s that C button. If you don’t have a thick stitch, you can use a zig-zag set at the very smallest length. It just won’t get as much detail. Or you could use a regular straight stitch and not get quite the “pop” of embroidery. But I have a thick stitch, so lucky me!


You can lower the feed dogs, if you want, to have total control of where the stitches are going. But I just went slow and left my feed dogs up, gently pulling the fabric to where I wanted the stitches to go along my tracings.



Just go slow, and follow your traced lines. If you have a “needle-down” feature on your machine, use it. If you don’t, just be sure to lower the needle into the fabric before lifting to turn as you go around your designs.



Just keep on stitching!


 
Then tear away the stabilizer and admire your work!




For the outside edges of the sunsuit, I used a scallop satin stitch my machine has pre-programmed. I’ve done the same technique  when I’ve made handkerchiefs.

You just do the decorative satin stitch all around, then cut close to the stitches. It looks pretty, and is actually really durable. I’ve washed and dried my handkerchiefs probably hundreds of times now, and the satin-stitched edges are still going strong! (see the hankie tutorial HERE)



Beautiful embroidered detail in a fraction of the time and without needing a fancy-pants machine. And my almost-70-year-old pattern is still in great condition, including the embroidery transfers.




Maybe I’ll even get to pass the pattern onto Ivy to sew for her own toddler one day.
From my grandmother to my mom to me to my daughter. A pretty great legacy for a little sunsuit pattern. 



Make sure to check out all the other lovely vintageyness in the Vintage May series at Craftiness is Not Optional and Skirt as Top

VM Large                     
Sunsuit: Vintage McCall’s 1330 c. 1947 Toddlers’ Sunsuit, fabric is linen blend from
Jo-Ann Stores
Sandals: Salt Water Sandals by Hoy Shoe The Original Sandal (affiliate link)
Special thanks to my sister for letting us use her beautiful garden and chickens for our photoshoot.



Related Posts with Thumbnails
 
Creative Commons License
Sew a Straight Line by Sabra Gubler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License.
Based on a work at http://sewastraightline.blogspot.com.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at sewastraightline@gmail.com. 01 10