Friday, January 30, 2015

Dressed-Up Jacket, hat and handwarmer

I have some fun winter wear to share with you all today.  A dressed-up coat, a fuzzy warm hat, and a pretty little handwarmer. 

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Below, I’ll share free patterns for the hat and handwarmer in three sizes! 

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And the coat is actually the Ruffled Cardigan from Blank Slate Patterns (affiliate link), with a couple of easy modifications.  I’m over at Melly Sews today sharing the details of the coat, along with the alterations I made as part of her Blank Slate Sewing Team.  I’d love for you to come check it out.  The coat turned out just beautiful, and there are some really gorgeous pictures of Ivy in it. 

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Come check it out HERE 
I also made the dress, but that I’ll save for another day.
Today, I want to share the hat and the handwarmer I made to go along with Ivy’s dress coat.   
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I was so happy with how the coat turned out.  I made it the same week I watched the entire fifth season of Downton Abby, and I was heavily influenced by the costuming in the series.  I wanted to make Ivy a classic winter look, so designed a simple hat and handwarmer to go along with the dressy coat.  Using a lush faux cuddle fur, the accessories are incredibly soft, and very warm. 
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After our shoot, my hands were freezing but Ivy’s were totally toasty.  In fact, I actually wrapped one of my hands in her still-warm handwarmer for the drive home!

The handwarmer hangs around the neck (so please use caution when using with a child, if you make this).  I used a fancy velvet brocade ribbon for the dressed up handwarmer. 

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Ivy loved the dressy set so much, that I made her a second set to go with her casual winter coat.  She loves these things, asking for them before she goes outside every time now.  The second handwarmer, I used the same cuddle fur for the outer, but did a simple ribbon, tied at the back for the handwarmer.

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And I lined both in her favorite Little Pony fabric that I bought as a bribe to keep her happy in Jo-Ann one day.  We were both happy that I finally found a use for it. 

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And apparently I forgot to trim the threads in the lining, as I look at that picture.  The handwarmer and hat are both fully lined, with no seams or stitch lines at all on the outside.  I have patterns in three sizes for 12 months- 6 years for you!  Get the patterns by clicking the image below, and read the rest of the post for the full tutorials.

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(note: pattern is hosted on Craftsy, of which I am an affiliate.)
For one hat and one handwarmer, you will need:
1/2 yard of fabric of each: main/outer fabric, lining
1/4 yard of heavyweight interfacing
1.5 yard of ribbon (if doing tied straps for handwarmer) OR 1 yard of ribbon (if doing looped strap for handwarmer)
THE PATTERN


ALL DRESSED UP HAT
a round cap, fully lined

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Cut out your fabric as directed on the pattern. 
1 Hat top for each: lining and main
1 hat side CUT ON FOLD for each: lining, main and (optional) interfacing* 

*Interfacing in the hat is optional, and I did not use any for the hats I made, so there are no pictures of the interfacing with the hat construction.  But I will explain where and how to use it.

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Fold the outer Hat Side in half, right sides together, lining up raw edges.  Sew along the short side (center back)

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Pin or clip the Hat Top to the Hat Side, right sides together.  Match the triangular notch of the Hat Top with the center front of the Hat Side, and the square notch of the Hat Top with the center back of the Hat Side.

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Sew all along the curve.

**If you are using interfacing, baste or adhere the interfacing to the wrong side of the lining.  The lining and the interfacing will be treated as one piece from here on out, and only referred to as the “lining”.**
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Sew the Hat Side Lining, right sides together, along the center back, LEAVING A 2-3 INCH GAP FOR TURNING
 
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Attach the Hat Top Lining to the Hat Side Lining the same way that the main fabrics were sewn.
You should now have two hat shells made of the main/outer fabric and the lining

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With the  lining right side out, and the main wrong side out, nest the hat shells in one another, matching center front and center back, and pin along the circular raw edge.

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Sew the circular raw edge completely around the circumference of the hat

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Turn the hat right side out through the gap in the lining’s center back seam.

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Pull the lining out, and find the gap in the center seam.

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Sew the gap closed. You can handstitch this, if you want a polished look.  Or just topstitch it closed if you are lazy, like me.

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Push the lining back up into the hat and…

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You’re done!
Except you’re not, because you need to make a handwarmer, right!?

ALL DRESSED UP HANDWARMER
Traditionally called a “muff”, this handwarmer is a fully lined tube that hangs around the neck and falls about the same area as a pocket

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Cut out your fabric as directed on pattern
1 Each of the main/outer fabric, lining and interfacing.
If you doing a tied-back strap, cut the ribbon into TWO equal length strips.
OR if doing a looped strap, measure around the neck of the child, to where you want the handwarmer to hit (just above the belly button), cut one inch longer than that measurement

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Cut one inch off either end of your interfacing and lining (the long ends)
(I didn’t cut my interfacing shorter on mine, but wished I had later)
Baste or adhere your lining to the wrong side of main fabric, centering the interfacing so that it is one inch in on either side, and matching short raw edges. 


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Fold the interfacing/main in half “hamburger style”, so that the short edges line up, right sides together.

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Pin and sew along the short edge.

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Pin your ribbon at the top fold edge, right sides together.  Tuck the ribbon in.  If doing tied-straps, repeat on other side.

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If doing looped strap, pull the ribbon through to the other side, careful not to twist, and pin right sides together with the other side of the ribbon at the other opening's fold.

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Baste the ribbon in place. 
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Make sure the loose ribbon stays tucked into the tube, out of the seam allowance.
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Fold the lining in half “hamburger style”, right sides togther.  Sew along the matched up short ends (not the folded ends), leaving a 3-4 inch gap for turning.

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Now, this part is a bit confusing, so stick with me.  We’re going to sew the lining in, so that there are no seams or stitch lines visible on the outside of the handwarmer.  To do this, you need to keep both lining and main tubes wrong side out, but match up one end’s tube opening of each, right sides together. 

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And then you are going to sew all the way around that circular edge.

And then repeat for the other openings on both tubes.  Make sure not to twist either tube.  When you are done with both openings, things should look like this:

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Both lining and main wrong side out, with either opening sewn right sides together, in the round.

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Here is another view of the tube openings sewn together.

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Now turn the whole thing out through the gap you left in the lining.

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It should look like this now. 

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Close the turning gap up by either hand stitching closed (for a cleaner look), or topstitching (because it’s super fast and easy)

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Turn it all right side out and you’ve got it!

Trim the ribbons on the tied-strap option to desired length, after measuring on child.  And done!

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My football-obsessed six year old son was super excited about the handwarmers.  He’s seen similar designs used to keep quarterbacks’ hands warm during games, only worn on a belt around the waist.  I have now been commissioned to make him one  for his upcoming spring flag football season.  I was also thinking it would be fun to sew a little hidden pocket on the lining, for a little special surprise.  Lots of fun options with such a simple item! 

Now, don’t forget to come see the coordinating Ruffled Coat over at Melly Sews

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Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Snake Skin Skinnies…sssssss

One day a few months ago, I was at Jo-Ann Stores shopping for…something.  I forget.  I’m there, like, all the time.  Anyway, they had this metallic snake skin print stretch denim in the Red Tag.  I gasped and grabbed it immediately.  An employee was nearby and must have seen, because he came over, all covertly, and told me there was a strong possibility all Red Tag fabrics were going to be 50% off the next week.  So I shoved the bolt down at the bottom on the pile and prayed no one else would find it before next week.  Thankfully, the next week, it was still there, and was, in fact, 50% off.   So now, I have snake skin skinny jeans.  Wanna see?

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The fabric is really nice.  I’m always surprised at what I can find in that Jo-Ann Red Tag section.  It has quite a bit of stretch to it, and then there is the funky print.  The gold “snake” print is actually a shiny metallic.  These are not timid jeans.  In fact, I kept second-guessing myself while sewing them, wondering if I had the guts to pull them off.  But I paired them with some comfortable neutrals, including my sweater-ish Lane Raglan, and I think I love them.

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The pattern is my altered Jalie 2908 that I used for my other skinny jeans here and here.  I extended the rise on this pair about an inch, so they come up higher.  Unfortunately, I didn’t think to also adjust the waist, which should have been cut more narrow, since this pair doesn’t hit me at the high hip, but more towards my waist.  So I have to wear a belt, or these slip right down. 

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Bum shot.  

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The other skinny jeans I’ve made, I’ve just done fake front pockets.  But it’s really annoying to not have actual functional front pockets on my jeans.  So I went with real pockets this time. 

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And I made them extra deep, adding a few inches to the Jalie pattern.  I don’t know why Jalie has the original pockets so shallow.  They hold chapstick, and not much else.  I can stick my whole hands in these

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Fingers extended. 
And see my measuring tape bracelet?  I’ve had it for just over a year and it is my absolute most favorite accessory ever.  You can get one from ModCloth  here.  (affiliate link)

Okay, so I’m going to try to focus more on details and finishing in my sewing this year.  Part of that, is going to be showing you the details of my sewing. 

First up, zipper fly.  I can never find jeans zippers in anything shorter than 7 inches locally.  So I always have to trim.  I know the  Official Zipper Sewing Powers That Be say you’re supposed to be able to use pliers to remove the zipper stops, trim things down, then reattach the zipper stops.  Have you ever tried to do this?  Were you successful?  Did you lose a finger in the process?  I just can’t figure out how it’s done.  So I use embroidery floss to tie a triple knot around the zipper teeth where I want my zipper to stop, then cut and trim the zipper above, leaving room for the seam allowance.  See my little knot up near the top of the zipper?  It works for me.

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Inside front.  You can see my pretty, deep designer pockets.  I used some leftovers from my Miss Havisham Garden Party dress, Amy Butler Soul Blossom voile.  I also got all fancy with the zipper fly.  I wanted to finish the edge with bias tape, to keep it clean and professional.  I started cutting some black tape, when I remembered I had this fancy-shmancy gold bias tape.  It’s shiny.

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Here is the inside back.  You can see here a little mistake I made.  The yoke pieces are supposed to be sewn to the top of the legs before the legs are sewn together.  But I forgot and sewed the center back seam first, then had to go back and sew the two yoke pieces together at the center, then add them to the top of the legs.  It doesn’t really make any difference, other than it’s not how jeans are traditionally made and so the seam layering and topstitching are a bit different here.  Fascinating, I know.  I do flat felled seams at my center front and back, and along my yokes every time.  I talk more about why and how HERE, but basically, I want my seams as strong as possibly through this area and so flat felled are the way to go.  Plus, they look so nice.


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Finally, just a quick shout-out to my amazing friend and neighbor, Camilla.  She has allowed me to use her beautiful home and yard as a backdrop so, so many times.  This time, I texted her to ask if she’d take some pictures for me again, and when I got to her house, she had set up this incredible “art gallery” scene for me, just because she thought it would be fun.  I love her.  Also, almost all of this art work was done by either herself or her husband.  She’s pretty much the coolest ever.

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Maybe one day I’ll be as cool as her.  At least in my sassy snake skin jeans I almost look the part.

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Jeans:  Pattern Jalie 2908, altered.  Fabric is stretch denim from Jo-Ann
Sweater: 
Lane Raglan, blogged HERE

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